The Big Work & Little Work of Seth Godin

Seth Godin (Flickr: Joi)

The now legendary Seth Godin probably blogs more than any other blogger I know or follow. Sometimes they’re the standard blog length of between 400 and 1000 words. But more often than not they’re a short few brief sentences, almost like a thought of the day. Most people couldn’t get away with one line blog posts. There’d be moans and a huge unsubscribe rate.

But Godin’s proven himself time again with books as manifestos for his arena-shaping ideas. When people use the words ‘thought-leader’ for a field, Seth Godin might be a prime example in the area of modern marketing and work, with paradigm shifts such as The Purple Cow, Lynchpin, Tribes and The Dip to name but a few. We even directly refer to The Dip in our own Website Planning Course, as it’s so helpful. He’s taken the publishing industry in another experimental direction with the Domino Project.

But always there is his blog. When you blog at his rate you’re going to inevitably have hits and misses. For me, and this is only me, out of every five posts Godin has two that either mean nothing to me or that are a a touch too obvious, one that is little to do with me but quite interesting, one that is obvious but of huge value to have it highlighted again and one that a beautiful clarification and valuable insight I didn’t have before.

But here is a recent post that struck me as being personally relevant. I suppose all good blog posts have to be personally relevant to the reader to make any worthy impression at all. This one would fall under the last two descriptions for a post. It seems obvious and common sense but sometimes that just what you need to hear.

Read Doing the big work (at the little table) 

About Alistair McBride

Al is the non-techie of the SelfAssemblySites' founding duo. His first businesses were in cultural tours, then later art dealing and consulting. He was SelfAssemblySites' first user and believes if he can do it, anyone can.

He has a wide and diverse range of interests and passions, core of which are usually art, psychology and innovation, and works on both profit and non-profit projects.

Alistair truly believes that a website can be a catalyst to making any idea reality in the 21st Century. You can create all sorts of non-profit and for profit projects take-off with a good website as your launch pad.

Follow him on Twitter at @WebsiteCoaching.

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